Board game introduces pathways to a competitive bioeconomy using hemp & bamboo

… huge changes in the way we do things. These changes are starting to happen in some sectors, such as renewable energy, but considering how huge our total energy appetite is right now (I think the technical term is “boat-load”), it’s a slow process. And that only affects the energy side of the equation, not the materials side, so even if we were to go 100% renewable energy tomorrow, our stuff, of which we are so fond of buying and using and disposing, will still be made mostly …

Dark Horse May Outdo Lithium-Ion Battery Storage

… Imergy’s ESP 250s are capable of delivering 250 kilowatts of electrical power for four or more hours. That’s at least 1 million kilowatt-hours of electrical energy housed in two 40-foot shipping containers. It’s an amount that – when considered alongside other salient attributes – makes ESP 250s ideal for utilities, large commercial, industrial and government end-users, and developers of renewable energy projects, Imergy states in a news release. Its ESP 250s, Imergy says, are ideal …

Abbott’s support for Old King Coal is worse than knighting a prince – Opinion – ABC Environment (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

… Australia”. It does not. It is a dying industry reliant on a resource that must be left in the ground if we want to maintain a liveable planet. But politics can move painfully slowly. On this issue Parliament House is stuck in slow-motion, while the rest of Australia is charging ahead. There are thousands of people working as solar installers; farmers are including renewable energy on the balance sheet by getting a stable income from wind turbines; communities are coming together against …

Gas investments may ‘never pay off’ | Newcastle Herald

… favour of renewable energy, such as solar. “That could mean that gas investments being made now might never pay off,” an institute statement said. “It’s a similar situation to that in the electricity market, in which demand was forecast to rise continuously but fell instead. It left infrastructure worth billions of dollars under-used while people on tight budgets felt the impact of price shocks that seemed to come from nowhere.” The energy institute, based at the …