India’s Independent Farmers Embrace Organic | Al Jazeera America

… technologies and irrigation systems, this fertile northern Indian state quickly became the seat of the country’s agricultural revolution in the 1970s and 1980s. And farmers like Singh, now a vibrant 69-year-Old with a snow white beard, started to see their harvests multiply. But alongside this burst of prosperity came the harrowing side effects of pouring chemicals into the ground: People’s health deteriorated rapidly, as did water and soil quality, and neither the government nor consumers …

FlyPunch! founder builds brand for natural fruit fly killer from Greenville

By Lillia Callum-Penso | May 10, 2015 A mere nine years ago, Mat Franken’s life was on a very different trajectory. Then, he worked in private finance, lived in Naples, Florida and thought little about what he ate. Fast forward to now, and the 37-year-Old father of two lives in Greenville, he and wife, Jodi, are very careful about what the family eats and Franken himself is making a go at running his own company. “You have to have an openness to, not to be too hippy dippy, but to the …

Goodall on GMO’s: “I Truly Believe We’re Poisoning Ourselves” | KUER

… says without genetically modified crops, we would not have the levels of food productivity that we have today. “I’ve never heard in all of the literature that I’ve reviewed of one single case of a GMO related plant or animal causing a health problem for a human being or for an animal for that matter,” he says. “I think this is an activist, radical viewpoint.” The 80-year-Old Goodall apologized at the end of her talk for a few stumbles where she lost her train of thought, but she says …

Farmers turn to GMO-free crops to boost income

By Christopher Doering | April 18, 2015 WASHINGTON –When Justin Dammann enters his southwestern Iowa cornfield this month, the 35-year-Old farmer will sow something these 2,400 acres have not seen in more than a decade — plants grown without genetically modified seeds. The corn, which will head to a processor 20 miles down the road this fall, will likely make its way into tortilla shells, corn chips and other consumable products made by companies taking advantage of growing consumer demand …

Which fruits, vegetables are most likely to be exposed to pesticides? – WTOP

… Sustainability Center, said in a news release. “We just don’t know enough about the health effects.” Studies have linked long-term pesticide exposure to increased risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, prostate, ovarian and other cancers, as well as depression and respiratory problems, Consumer Reports says. The analysis is based on the risk to a 3 1/2-year-Old child because kids are especially vulnerable to the dietary risk from pesticides. The risk to adults would be lower, …

Slippery slope? Heated debate in Uganda over super crops | Zee News

From zeenews.india.com, posted March 18 2015 Wakiso: With his half-acre banana plantation, Charles Semakula can put his family`s favourite food on the table every day. Green cooking bananas, or matooke, are a feature of almost every main course for 38-year-Old Semakula, his wife and four children, while sweet yellow ones make for pudding. Matooke is a national staple in Uganda, and many say a meal isn`t a meal without it. “When I spend a week without eating matooke, I don`t feel …

CNN Explores the World’s Most Endangered Places – MensJournal.com

… like overcrowding in India. We caught up with Weir days before the premier to talk about his new adventure lifestyle and storytelling at the crossroads. What’s The Wonder List about? In its stripped-down, one-word essence it’s a show about change. It all started when I looked at my now 11-year-Old daughter and realized that she is going to turn my age in 2050, and I just wondered. Will she still live on a planet with wild tigers? With a Jordan River and a Dead Sea? How much of the glaciers …

Abbott’s support for Old King Coal is worse than knighting a prince – Opinion – ABC Environment (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

… least of it. The Prime Minister’s knighthood decision was dumb, but it isn’t hurting anybody (except maybe himself) in the comprehensive, long-lasting way some of his other decisions are. Worse than knighting a prince is pledging allegiance to Old King Coal. Who could forget when Tony Abbott declared that, “coal is good for humanity”? It is not. Coal has been left behind by the clever, cleaner alternatives we have today. Then the PM said, “coal has a big future in …