Maine following path to organic dairy farms – The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

By Tom Bell, Staff Writer | June 28, 2015 WHITEFIELD — A national shortage of organic milk – the result of changing American diets – is fueling interest in Maine among dairy processors eager to increase supplies and meet growing demand. As many dairy farms in the West struggle under drought conditions that have dried up pasturelands, Maine is seen as promising territory. Its abundance of water and land gives the state an advantage because organic dairy cows spend much of their lives …

Farmers who switch to organic face strict rules, costs, red tape – Times Union

… of research, and with no previous experience, she exited the conventional working world to start a farm. She left health care, she said, because she saw so little being done to prevent health problems before they started. “Healthy food will keep us healthy,” she said. Now, she owns Eight Mile Creek Farm in Westerlo, running it with her daughter and an intern. She raises cows, chickens, pigs and horses, and grows more than 30 kinds of vegetables. When looking around at the rolling …

Just Because Your Chicken Is Organic Doesn’t Mean It Was Raised Humanely | Mother Jones

… include very many specific instructions about the way the animals themselves are raised. “When people pick up organic milk, they’re expecting that the cows are out on pasture most of the time,” says Luke Meerman, one of the farmers behind Michigan-based Grassfields Cheese. And he’s right. In a phone survey conducted for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), 68 percent of the consumers contacted said they expected that animals raised on …

U.S. forced to import corn as shoppers demand organic food : Business

… market for U.S. growers willing to avoid the use of artificial chemicals and genetically modified seeds, said Laura Batcha, chief executive officer of the association, which includes Whole Foods Market Inc., Whitewave Foods Co. and Earthbound Farm. The report is “a help-wanted sign” for U.S. farmers, Batcha said. “There are market distortions that are pretty striking.” Most of the corn and soybean shipments become feed for chickens and cows so they can be certified …